123D Sculpt

123D Sculpt allows users to create sculptures on their iPad. After launching the app, uses are provided with a brief overview of the app’s functionality. Next, users choose the object they wish to sculpt, which includes creatures (e.g., man, head, dog, etc.), geometric shapes (e.g., cube, sphere, torus, etc.), and objects (e.g., sneaker, t-shirt, jet, etc.). Once selected, users are able to sculpt the object by selecting a tool from the left-side menu and then running their finger over the object. Additionally, users can add color to their sculpture using the paintbrush that is also located on the…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 6.9
B. Design - 8.7
C. Engagement - 8.7

8.1

An Innovative App for Art Production

8
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123D Sculpt allows users to create sculptures on their iPad. After launching the app, uses are provided with a brief overview of the app’s functionality. Next, users choose the object they wish to sculpt, which includes creatures (e.g., man, head, dog, etc.), geometric shapes (e.g., cube, sphere, torus, etc.), and objects (e.g., sneaker, t-shirt, jet, etc.). Once selected, users are able to sculpt the object by selecting a tool from the left-side menu and then running their finger over the object. Additionally, users can add color to their sculpture using the paintbrush that is also located on the left-side menu. There is an additional menu on the top that lets users undo strokes, redo strokes, save their work, center their sculpture, and record (e.g., photograph or create a video) of their sculpture. Users can then tap the “Gallery” button on the top left of the screen to view their sculptures, images, and recordings, and they can also share their images and recordings of their sculpture by saving them to their photo library, uploading them to iTunes and Facebook, sending them over email, saving them to Dropbox, or printing them. Plus, they can tap the “community” button and view sculptures made by other users.

Instructional Ideas

  1. Teachers can allow students to create a sculpture of any type using this app. Next, teachers can have students compose a journal entry about their sculpture by responding to one of the following example prompts: (1) What was your vision for this sculpture? (2) What message do you hope your sculpture conveys to its viewers? (3) What would you name your sculpture, and what does its name represent?
  2. After studying famous sculptors, teachers can have students research some of their famous works and choose one. Next, students will have to reproduce that sculpture using this app. Once they are finished, students can write a short paper in which they evaluate how closely they were able to replicate the original sculpture in their work.
  3. Teachers can have students research a famous sculptor and his or her works. Next, teachers can have students analyze the sculptor’s work for style. Students can then write a journal entry that explains the style used by the sculptor. Finally, students can attempt to produce a sculpture of the same style using this app.
  4. Teachers can have students view the gallery of community members’ sculptures and choose one. Next, teachers can have students write a critique of the sculpture. Some ideas to include in the critique are its: (1) color scheme, (2) shape, (3) the finish, and (4) tags and descriptors.
  5. After reading a text, teachers can have students create a sculpture of a character, object, or theme from it using this app. Afterward, students can compose a short piece of writing that explains why and how their sculpture represents the text. Images of the sculpture and writing can be uploaded to a class website for sharing.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility

Screenshots

  • 123D Sculpt Screenshot
  • 123D Sculpt Screenshot
  • 123D Sculpt Screenshot
  • 123D Sculpt Screenshot
  • 123D Sculpt Screenshot

Screenshots

  • 123D Sculpt Screenshot
  • 123D Sculpt Screenshot
  • 123D Sculpt Screenshot
  • 123D Sculpt Screenshot
  • 123D Sculpt Screenshot