Education.com

Freemium! Education.com provides users with a database of games for math, reading, and writing. With the menu on the left side of the screen, users can click the “Games” option and then sort the games by grade level and subject area. Education.com then reports the corresponding games and users can select the one they wish to play by clicking it. The game then loads and it prompts users to answer questions and complete tasks by clicking certain objects on the screen. As they click, the game provides users feedback regarding the accuracy of their responses. When users complete a stage…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 6.5
B. Design - 8.3
C. Engagement - 7.1

7.3

Accessible Games for Teaching Foundational Math and Literacy Skills

7

Education.com provides users with a database of games for math, reading, and writing. With the menu on the left side of the screen, users can click the “Games” option and then sort the games by grade level and subject area. Education.com then reports the corresponding games and users can select the one they wish to play by clicking it. The game then loads and it prompts users to answer questions and complete tasks by clicking certain objects on the screen. As they click, the game provides users feedback regarding the accuracy of their responses. When users complete a stage or activity, the game reports their progress.

Please Note: This review only focused on the games that can be accessed for free from this website. Users can click the Worksheets, Workbooks, Activities, Lesson Plans, Exercises, Songs, and Stories options to access additional materials. Users can also subscribe to Education.com to access more features and options.

Instructional Ideas

  1. Before a lesson, teachers can have students play a game as a pre-assessment and record their score. Next, teachers can lead students through the lesson. Afterwards, teachers can have students play the same game as a post-assessment and record their score. Teachers can then compare the scores from the pre-assessment to the post-assessment to identify student growth.
  2. After teaching a lesson about a certain topic, teachers can have students play a game that reinforces that topic. After playing the game, teachers can have students explain to them what they did and how they used the skill from the lesson to complete the game.
  3. As a reward, teachers can allow students class time to play the games. As they play the games, teachers can make sweeps of the room to monitor students. During those sweeps, teachers can ask students what game they are playing, the skills they are using to complete the game, and if they have any questions.
  4. To develop students’ reading, writing, and math abilities along with interpersonal skills, teachers can have students play and complete these games in pairs. To add a twist, teachers can have one student tell the second what to do to complete the activity. The second student will then complete the activity based on the directions from the first student. After completing the activity, teachers can have students swap roles and complete the next activity.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility

Screenshots