Hypothes.is

Free! Hypothes.is is a web tool that allows users to annotate online text and webpages. After registering with the Hypothes.is and logging in, users next need to paste the address of the website they wish to annotate into the box. Hypothes.is then loads the website in its shell. To annotate the website, users must first select text with their mouse, and then they can choose to highlight the text in color and/or annotate it. The “Highlight” option places a color overlay on the text, so it stands out when users view the website. The “Annotate” option allows users to add…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 8.3
B. Design - 8.8
C. Engagement - 8.3

8.5

If You’re Taking Online Notes, You Need This Tool!

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Hypothes.is is a web tool that allows users to annotate online text and webpages. After registering with the Hypothes.is and logging in, users next need to paste the address of the website they wish to annotate into the box. Hypothes.is then loads the website in its shell. To annotate the website, users must first select text with their mouse, and then they can choose to highlight the text in color and/or annotate it. The “Highlight” option places a color overlay on the text, so it stands out when users view the website. The “Annotate” option allows users to add notes, images, stylized text, links, and tags in the margin next to the selected text. When finished, users can decide if they wish to make their notes public or keep them private, and they can send their annotations by clicking the “Share” button and choosing if they wish to send them via email, over social media, or with a direct link. Lastly, when other users view the annotated website that was sent to them, they can click the “Reply” button beneath the annotations to add their thoughts.

Instructional Ideas

  1. When researching a topic, students can locate websites and then use Hypothes.is to make notes about the information and how they could incorporate that information into their assignment. After annotating a website, students can get a link to their annotations via the share option and save that link to a document. As they continue to annotate websites and add links to their document, students will have several pieces of information available when they begin to complete their research project.
  2. Teachers can assign students an online text to read with specific prompts. As students read, they can highlight the textual evidence they found that corresponds to the prompts and use the annotation tool to write an explanation that connects the evidence to the prompt. When finished, students can share their responses with a classmate or their teacher.
  3. When critiquing a website, teachers can have students use this tool to annotate features they like in the website and features that they do not find appealing. Next, students can write a short explanation about the features explaining their thoughts about it. Students can then share their annotated webpages by posting a link to them in a classroom website. Their classmates can then view the annotated websites and reply to the comments, stating if they agree or disagree with the critique and why.
  4. Teachers can have students read an online text using this website. For each paragraph, teachers can have students use the annotate tool to write a “hashtag” of the paragraph’s meaning, theme, or overall message as a method to summarize the paragraph. That way, when finished, students will have a running record of their ideas throughout the entire text.
  5. This tool can be used to provide feedback to students in response to a website they designed or document they wrote. To begin, students will have to complete their website or document and share it in a public view. Next, students will have to post or send a link to their work in a class website or to a peer. The student’s peer can then load the website or document in Hypothes.is and annotate its strengths, shortcomings, and ideas for improvement. When finished, the peer can send a link of the annotations back to the student who created the website or document, and that student can view the annotations to guide the revision process.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility

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