Sleepover in Antarctica

Sleepover in Antarctica is a picture book about three children’s trip to the southern content. After loading the app, users must tap the red “Triangle” button on the bottom right of the screen to begin the story.  Next, images and text will appear on the screen, and users can begin reading the story. After each page, users must tap the red “Triangle” button again to advance pages. If users wish to view all the book’s pages at once, they can tap the down “Triangle” at the top of the page, and they can change pages by tapping on…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 6.7
B. Design - 8.7
C. Engagement - 6

7.1

Take a Trip to Antarctica!

7

Sleepover in Antarctica is a picture book about three children’s trip to the southern content. After loading the app, users must tap the red “Triangle” button on the bottom right of the screen to begin the story.  Next, images and text will appear on the screen, and users can begin reading the story. After each page, users must tap the red “Triangle” button again to advance pages. If users wish to view all the book’s pages at once, they can tap the down “Triangle” at the top of the page, and they can change pages by tapping on one of the smaller icons. In addition, users can choose if they want the app to read the book to them by tapping on or off the “Read Aloud” button.

Instructional Ideas

  1. As an individual activity, students can read the book or have the app read the book to them. After all students have read the book, the teacher can begin a class discussion by asking students: (1) What was your favorite part of the book?, (2) Can you retell me what happened in the book?, and (3) If you went to Antarctica, what would you want to do?
  2. For students who need extra reading support, teachers can adjust the app so it reads the text to them. However, before turning the page, teachers can require students to read the text back to the app and then turn the page.
  3. As an extension project, students can read the book and identify one topic of interest. Next, students can do a project where they read about the topic they identified on other sources and then report back to the group. For example, if students are interested in Antarctica’s temperature, they can research it with the guidance of their teacher and/or parents. After finding the average, high, and low temperatures, they can then record that information and share it with the class.
  4. After students read the story, teachers can have them think of a place they have visited. Next, teachers can have students draw a storyboard of their experience about visiting that place on paper. Or, for advanced students, they can use the “Story Creator’ feature in the Collins Big Cat app to create their story. Once finished, students can share their stories with a classmate.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility

 
Screenshots

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