TimeMaps

Free! TimeMaps provides users an interactive map of the world that changes to show the development of different parts of the world as the timeline is adjusted. To change the map, users can tap the tabs on the left and right of the screen that display the time range of the map. As the time range is adjusted, the map displays shaded areas over different regions that indicate the presence of a civilization, and pins appear on the map as well. Users can hover their mouse over the pins to access information, and they can click the underline terms to…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 6.3
B. Design - 7.3
C. Engagement - 6.7

6.8

TimeMaps: A Must-Have Resource for the History Classroom

Summary : Connecting Events to an Interactive Map

TimeMaps provides users an interactive map of the world that changes to show the development of different parts of the world as the timeline is adjusted. To change the map, users can tap the tabs on the left and right of the screen that display the time range of the map. As the time range is adjusted, the map displays shaded areas over different regions that indicate the presence of a civilization, and pins appear on the map as well. Users can hover their mouse over the pins to access information, and they can click the underline terms to learn more. When the underlined terms are clicked, a new window opens that displays information. Users can also scroll below the map to view a timeline of the world that ranges from 4300BC to 2005AD. On the timeline, users can see when different empires and civilizations existed, and they can also click the pins in the timeline to see a map of the world for a specific year.

Instructional Ideas

  1. During or after a lesson about a certain civilization, teachers can have students learn more about that civilization using this website. They can see when the civilization existed, learn key facts about the civilization, and identify where on the map the civilization was located. After identifying this information from the website, students can record it for future reference.
  2. After viewing the different time periods and corresponding maps on this website, teachers can have students pick a time and place when they would want to live. As part of this assignment, students would have to include commentary about why they chose that time/place, what they would do for an occupation, what they expect their day-in day-out life to be like, and how long they would expect to live. Students can share their thoughts by making a class presentation, posting an infographic to a class website, or talking in small groups.
  3. When completing a research assignment, teachers can direct students to this website to locate information they can use in their assignment.
  4. After reviewing the different civilizations that are included on the timeline, teachers and students can work to identify which civilizations were not included or they can research additional information that can be included on the map. For example, there is little information offered about Native Americans, and teachers can have students write the information that could be included on the map. They can then suggest it for being included on the website by emailing it to [email protected].
  5. After learning about the different civilizations, teachers can have students use the timeline and map to rank them according to different categories, such as: (1) The top three most dominant civilizations, (2) The top five most important civilizations to mankind’s development, (3) The civilization with the best legacy. The teacher and students can develop the categories together and students can then work to identify the civilizations that should be included in the category. Once all students have decided on the civilizations for a category, the teacher can have students share ideas via a class discussion.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity

Screenshots