The Tone Deaf Test

Free! The Tone Deaf Test is a website that uses three question types to determine if an individual is tone deaf. To begin, users must launch the website and then click the “Test Sound” button to ensure their computer or device is playing the sound. Next, users must tap the “Start” button. They will then be asked if they play an instrument, and they can respond by tapping the “Yes” or “No” button. At this point, the website will begin administering the tone deaf test, and the test is divided into three sections. Each section begins with an example question,…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 5.8
B. Design - 8.5
C. Engagement - 6.3

6.9

The Tone Deaf Test: A Resource for the Music Classroom

Summary : Are You Tone Deaf? Find Out!

The Tone Deaf Test is a website that uses three question types to determine if an individual is tone deaf. To begin, users must launch the website and then click the “Test Sound” button to ensure their computer or device is playing the sound. Next, users must tap the “Start” button. They will then be asked if they play an instrument, and they can respond by tapping the “Yes” or “No” button. At this point, the website will begin administering the tone deaf test, and the test is divided into three sections.

Each section begins with an example question, which is intended to support users in understanding the question format. A series of questions are then presented, and users respond to each question. After completing the test, the website reports if users are or are not tone deaf along with a breakdown of their answers by section. If users are not tone deaf, they will earn a digital badge, which they can share!

Instructional Ideas for The Tone Deaf Test

  1. At the beginning of the year, teachers can have students complete this test to get baseline data about their ability to hear music and distinguish tones. At regular intervals (e.g., every two weeks or every month), teachers can again have students take this test. Students and teachers can then compare the two sets of scores to identify improvement.
  2. Once students are familiar with this test, they can move from a digital version of the test to one that uses physical instruments. To do so, teachers can have one student play two notes on an instrument. Another student determine if the notes are the same or different. For each note played, the student who played it should record the note and if the other student was correctly identified it. Once at least 10 notes have been played, students can swap roles.
  3. Teachers can have students administer a tone deaf test using digital instruments. To begin, students can pick an instrument from the Virtual Musical Instruments website. They can then play two notes to a fellow student. That student will then have to identify if the notes were the same or different. If they are different, that student will then have to identify which note was higher or lower. After playing at least 10 notes, the students should swap roles and repeat the process.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility

Screenshots of The Tone Deaf Test

Screenshot of the Tone Deaf Test

Screenshot of the Tone Deaf Test