The Leading Authority on Educational Apps

US History Timeline (Free)

US History Timeline (Free) provides a detailed outline about the history of the United States. After launching the app, users can choose one of four options located at the bottom of the screen. The “Events” option shows users a list of occurrences, which spans from 40000 BC to 2012 AD. The events are listed chronologically, and users can tap on an event to learn more about it and access a link to Wikipedia. The “People” option includes an index of notable individuals that is organized alphabetically. Users can tap a person’s name to learn more about the individual,…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 5.7
B. Design - 8.7
C. Engagement - 7.3

7.2

Need to know what happened when?

7

US History Timeline (Free) provides a detailed outline about the history of the United States. After launching the app, users can choose one of four options located at the bottom of the screen. The “Events” option shows users a list of occurrences, which spans from 40000 BC to 2012 AD. The events are listed chronologically, and users can tap on an event to learn more about it and access a link to Wikipedia. The “People” option includes an index of notable individuals that is organized alphabetically. Users can tap a person’s name to learn more about the individual, and a link to the individual’s Wikipedia page is also provided. Users can also tap the “Presidents” button on the top right in this option to view a list of United States’ presidents and access the link to their Wikipedia page. The “Territories” option shows users maps of the United States that begins with the 13 Colonies and progresses through the Hawaii Annexation. The “World” option shows two parallel timelines, one for the world and one for the United States, on the same graphic. The timeline spans from 1492 through 2003.

Instructional Ideas

  1. Teachers can use this app as a bell ringer activity. To do so, teachers can show students a timeline included in this app, either the “Events” or “World” timeline will work. Next, the teacher can briefly introduce an event and discuss the event’s significance. At this point, teachers can launch a think-pair-share activity by having students view the next events on the timeline and ask them, “What do you suppose would have happened if the event we just discussed never occurred?” Students can then respond by composing a journal entry that they could discuss with a partner. Following that discussion, the partners could share their ideas with the whole class.
  2. To brainstorm a research topic, teachers can have students view the different events and people included in this app, and they can explore the Wikipedia link. Next, students can list three events and/or people that interest them. For each event/person selected, students can write a brief explanation that points out why they are interested in researching this event/person further. Teachers can then review the list and explanations with the purpose of helping students select a topic for their research.
  3. For the list of events and people, students can view the lists and choose the top three most important events and people. They could then write rationales that explain the importance of the event and people. Teachers can take this activity a step further by having students create infographics for the most important event and person. To create the infographic, students can use the Popboardz, Explain Everything, or Pic Collage app. Teachers can conclude this activity by having students share their work in small groups or present it to the whole class.
  4. Teachers can use this app for a class debate. To do so, teachers can give students a prompt such as “Who is the most important individual listed in this app,” or “Which event listed in this app had the biggest impact?” Next, teachers can divide the class into groups of 3-5 students, and each group can make their selection. When ready, teachers can have each group present their opening comments. Following that round, the groups can engage each other using a “point-counterpoint” format. The teacher will act as a moderator to ensure all points and counterpoints are grounded in thought and logic.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
0 star = Not Applicable
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
0 star = Not Applicable
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility
0 star = Not Applicable

Screenshots

  • US History Timeline(Free) Screenshot
  • US History Timeline(Free) Screenshot
  • US History Timeline(Free) Screenshot
  • US History Timeline(Free) Screenshot
  • US History Timeline(Free) Screenshot
  • US History Timeline(Free) Screenshot
  • US History Timeline(Free) Screenshot
  • US History Timeline(Free) Screenshot
  • US History Timeline(Free) Screenshot
  • US History Timeline(Free) Screenshot