Calorie Counter: diets and activities

[ios_app id="641488798"] Calorie Counter monitors users’ daily caloric intake by tracking and recording the amount of food they consume daily, as compared to the amount of physical activities in which they engage. To use Calorie Counter, users must first create their own unique personal profile, which then allows users to create individualized health goals. To monitor users’ progress toward meeting their goals, Calorie Counter requires users to manually upload their consumption and activity data. Using this data, Calorie Counter is able to track if users are on their way to meeting their goals. Additionally, Calorie Counter includes many chart and graph options that…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 5
B. Design - 8.2
C. Engagement - 9.1

7.4

Summary : An app that empowers students to meet their personalized nutritional goals by monitoring what they eat and what they do!

[ios_app id=”641488798″]

Calorie Counter monitors users’ daily caloric intake by tracking and recording the amount of food they consume daily, as compared to the amount of physical activities in which they engage. To use Calorie Counter, users must first create their own unique personal profile, which then allows users to create individualized health goals. To monitor users’ progress toward meeting their goals, Calorie Counter requires users to manually upload their consumption and activity data. Using this data, Calorie Counter is able to track if users are on their way to meeting their goals. Additionally, Calorie Counter includes many chart and graph options that allow users to see their progress and modify their daily food intake and activities accordingly.

Instructional Ideas

  1. Teachers can assign students to track their daily food intake and activities for a week, which will allow students to see their dietary and activity habits.
  2. At the beginning of a semester, unit, or academic year, teachers and students can collaborate on specific nutritional goals, and this app can be used to monitor students’ progress toward meeting those goals.
  3. Teachers can have students input data for a fictional person who has unhealthy eating habits and data for a fictional person who has healthy eating habits. Next, teachers can have students compare the daily caloric intake of these two individuals. Lastly, students can make predictions about what will happen to these two fictional people over time if they continue with their eating habits, and teachers can have students share their predictions. Examples of how students can share their predictions include creating a PowerPoint presentation, writing a paper, or designing a poster board.
  4. Teachers can have students create realistic and unrealistic nutritional goals using this app. Next, teachers can discuss with students or have students research how individuals may go about meeting these goals. For example, a realistic nutritional goal may be met by individuals practicing responsible dieting habits coupled with reasonable exercise routines. An unrealistic goal may be met by individuals practicing outrageous dieting habits that involve the ingestion of diet pills, starting habits that lead to eating disorders (e.g., bulimia and/or anorexia), or engaging in outrageous workout programs. Finally, teachers can have students compose a plan for how they will meet their personal nutritional goals.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity

Screenshots

The app was not found in the store. 🙁