Inkle Writer

Free! Inkle Writer is a template-based resource for users who are interested in drafting and publishing original choose-your-own-adventure stories. Before writing their first story, users are encouraged to go to the Inkle Writer website and click the “Read Example” button. A story will then load and users can tap its title to access the its beginning. The story is formatted so users read a few paragraph before having to make a choice. To make a choice, users have to click one of two options, and new text will load in response to the option selected. In this way, users actually…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 7.4
B. Design - 8.8
C. Motivation - 8.7

8.3

Digitalizing the reading and writing of choose-your-own-adventure stories!

8

Inkle Writer is a template-based resource for users who are interested in drafting and publishing original choose-your-own-adventure stories. Before writing their first story, users are encouraged to go to the Inkle Writer website and click the “Read Example” button. A story will then load and users can tap its title to access the its beginning. The story is formatted so users read a few paragraph before having to make a choice. To make a choice, users have to click one of two options, and new text will load in response to the option selected. In this way, users actually choose their own adventure as they read. Once users understand the style, format, and flow of reading choose-your-own-adventure books, they can return to the Inkle Writer website and click the “Start Writing” button to begin their own story. To begin writing, users will need to click the new button, and the website will load a template that allows them to add a title, author’s name, the first section of text, and then options. The options are the choices users will make in the story, and users need to include at least two options. When an option is added, users will then repeat the process of writing additional text until they wish to add additional options. To conclude the story, users can click the red “End” button to finish it. To support users as they write their story, they can click the “Map” button on the top right to see a flow chart of their story, the “Content” button to see an outline of their story, and the “Read” button to engage their story as a reader. To toggle back to the writing view, users can click the “Write” button. As they write, users can stylize their text and add images using the buttons on the left side of the screen. When finished with their story, users can tap the “Share” button to get a URL address for their story. Users can then send out that URL address via email or posting it to a website, which lets other individuals access their story.

Instructional Ideas

  1. Before having students write their original choose-your-own-adventure story, teachers can bring in paper-based versions of these stories and share them with their class. Next, teachers can have students view a digital version of this genre of writing by clicking the “Read Examples” option on the Inkle Writer’s main page.
  2. As a pre-writing exercise, teachers can have students storyboard their own choose-your-own-adventure story on paper before having them click the “Start Writing” option on the Inkle Writer’s main page.
  3. As an in-class, creative writing assignment, teachers can have students compose their own choose-your-own-adventure story. When finished, students can post the URL to their story on a class website, so other students can enjoy their writing.
  4. After reading multiple choose-your-own-adventure stories written by their classmates, teachers can facilitate a discussion regarding what makes a quality choose-your-own-adventure story. Specific questions teachers can ask related to this topic include: (1) What makes you care about the characters?, (2) How important is the setting and details of the story?, and (3) Do you think there needs to be a “correct” choice when providing options? Students can take information from these discussions and use it in their story.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility

Screenshots

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