Learn with Homer: Reading & Educational Games

Learn with Homer is designed to support young users as they develop their reading abilities. After creating an account by entering an email address, taking a picture, and inputting the user’s age, Learn with Homer presents them with multiple options that include: Learn to Read, Discover the World, Songs and Rhymes, Larger than Life, Draw a Picture, Record Your Voice, Story Time, and Brain Games. The “Learn to Read” option includes 21 lessons and each lesson includes multiple tutorials. Each tutorial presents users with a topic to be learned (e.g. the “Ah” sound, double vowels), the tutorials include…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 6.8
B. Design - 8.3
C. Engagement - 8.3

7.8

Homer makes learning to read a breeze!

8

Learn with Homer is designed to support young users as they develop their reading abilities. After creating an account by entering an email address, taking a picture, and inputting the user’s age, Learn with Homer presents them with multiple options that include: Learn to Read, Discover the World, Songs and Rhymes, Larger than Life, Draw a Picture, Record Your Voice, Story Time, and Brain Games. The “Learn to Read” option includes 21 lessons and each lesson includes multiple tutorials. Each tutorial presents users with a topic to be learned (e.g. the “Ah” sound, double vowels), the tutorials include various identification, audio, and writing activities that build and reinforce users’ learning of the tutorial’s content. The “Discover the World,” “Story Time,” “Songs and Rhymes,” and “Larger than Life” options contain stories, songs, and poems that users can read or have the app read to them. The “Draw a Picture” option lets users create an image using different colors and symbols and then saves it to their camera roll. The “Record Your Voice” option allows users to record different words, songs, lyrics, and other parts of language they say. The “Brain Games” option contains multiple activities that has users engage prompts to learn language, words, sizes, shapes, and more!

Please Note: Only a limited amount of content can be accessed from this app for free. Users will have to subscribe in order to access all of this app’s content.

Instructional Ideas

  1. Teachers can have a small group of students either read or listen to a story independently using this app. Next, the students can come together to discuss what they liked about the story. Some prompts for stirring conversation include: (1) What character(s) did you like the most?, (2) Where did the story take place?, (3) What happened in the story?, and (4) If you could change one thing in the story, what would it be? Students can share their ideas verbally and the teacher can use follow-up questions to further students’ responses. Teachers can also have students find the text that best supports or exemplifies their comments.
  2. Teachers can have students read a story or poem from this app and then use the “Draw a Picture” option to illustrate the major theme, concept, or idea that they read. Once complete, students can view their picture in their camera roll and email it to their teacher.
  3. During “down time” or as a reward, teachers can allow students to complete different Brain Game activities in this app. Teachers can have students either tell them about the different activities they completed or use the “Record Your Voice” option.
  4. As an independent learning activity or homework assignment, students can be required to complete one lesson or tutorial from the “Learn to Read” option. Following the activity, teachers can have students demonstrate the skill they learned by completing an activity. For example, students can be given a text and then underline all the words in the text that contain a certain letter or sound. By using a follow-up activity, teachers can reinforce student learning.
  5. Once students are familiar with the types of texts in this app, teachers can have them create a text by either modifying an existing text from this app or creating one from scratch. Students can write their text using an Office app or an app such as PopBoardz or Popplet. Students could also write their story using paper and pencil. If the story was made using an app, students can email their work to their teacher. If they wrote their story using paper and pencil, students submit their work to their teacher. The teacher can then post the stories to a class website or print out the stories if they were made using an app. If the story was made using an app or if it was made using paper and pencil, teachers can encourage activities where students share their stories with one another.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility

Screenshots

  • Homer - #1 Learn to Read Program for Kids Age 2-8 Screenshot
  • Homer - #1 Learn to Read Program for Kids Age 2-8 Screenshot
  • Homer - #1 Learn to Read Program for Kids Age 2-8 Screenshot
  • Homer - #1 Learn to Read Program for Kids Age 2-8 Screenshot
  • Homer - #1 Learn to Read Program for Kids Age 2-8 Screenshot
  • Homer - #1 Learn to Read Program for Kids Age 2-8 Screenshot
  • Homer - #1 Learn to Read Program for Kids Age 2-8 Screenshot
  • Homer - #1 Learn to Read Program for Kids Age 2-8 Screenshot
  • Homer - #1 Learn to Read Program for Kids Age 2-8 Screenshot
  • Homer - #1 Learn to Read Program for Kids Age 2-8 Screenshot
  • Homer - #1 Learn to Read Program for Kids Age 2-8 Screenshot
  • Homer - #1 Learn to Read Program for Kids Age 2-8 Screenshot