Mathema [M]

Mathema teaches mathematical principles to users. To view its content, users must tap the “Lined” button on the top left of the screen and then tap the “Content” button. Users are then able to peruse the app’s content by first, second, and third mathematical experience, and each experience contains an interlude that further explains the content taught in the experience. Users can then tap the “Menu” button to return to the home menu, where they can tap the “Explanations” button to view videos that further explain the mathematical principles taught or the “Activities” button to engage different mathematical…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 6.8
B. Design - 9
C. Engagement - 7.7

7.8

Mathema: A Math App for Advanced Learners

Summary : One of the most thoughtful math apps created

Mathema teaches mathematical principles to users. To view its content, users must tap the “Lined” button on the top left of the screen and then tap the “Content” button. Users are then able to peruse the app’s content by first, second, and third mathematical experience, and each experience contains an interlude that further explains the content taught in the experience. Users can then tap the “Menu” button to return to the home menu, where they can tap the “Explanations” button to view videos that further explain the mathematical principles taught or the “Activities” button to engage different mathematical exercises. As users read the content in this app and complete its different activities, they can tap the “ribbon” button on the top right of the screen. By tapping that button, it allows users to return to the content by tapping the “Bookmarks” button located on the menu.

Instructional Ideas

  1. Teachers can assign students a section from a mathematical experience or interlude to analyze. Teachers can require students to compose a paragraph that summarizes the concept being taught or emphasized. Next, students can compose another paragraph that explains why and/or how the concept applies to their lives.
  2. Teachers can have students read about an activity in this app and then complete it. Students will then have to compose a paragraph explanation that explains the mathematical principle(s) needed to complete the activity.
  3. Teachers can assign students a particular section of this app’s content to read and study. As students read, teachers can have them identify the three, five, or seven most challenging words included in the text. For each word, students will have to define it and create an image that represents the word’s meaning. For example, when reading about the game Recreation with Hex, the word “hexagon” is included. Students can first explain what a hexagon is and then draw a hexagon. By writing the definition and drawing an image representative of the term, it will supports students in understanding the term before engaging additional texts or games that require an understanding of the term.
  4. Over the course of a semester or school year, teachers can require students to complete all the experiences and activities included in this app. As students complete the different experiences and activities, they can “bookmark” their favorites by tapping the ribbon. Finally, after having completed all the experiences and activities, students can review the ones that they bookmarked and create a top-five or top-ten list of their favorite activities. For each activity included in their list, students can write a paragraph that explains why they chose the activity. These lists and explanations can then be uploaded to a class website so students can share their lists with one another.
  5. After students become familiar with this app and its contents, teachers can assign students mathematical topics that were not included in this app. In response, students will compose an introductory paragraph that explains the topic and also design an activity that fellow classmates can complete to reinforce the topic. If students are able to digitalize the activity, they could potentially post both the paragraph and activity to a class website. Classmates will then be able to read the paragraph and complete the activity.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility

Screenshots

  • ‎Mathema [M] Screenshot
  • ‎Mathema [M] Screenshot
  • ‎Mathema [M] Screenshot
  • ‎Mathema [M] Screenshot
  • ‎Mathema [M] Screenshot