Mobile Math Playground

Free! Mobile Math Playground provides several dozen math games designed for elementary and middle school students. The games’ aim to develop students’ ability to add, multiply, divide, use decimals, and problem solve. To access the games, the webpage first has to be loaded and then a game selected. The game loads and directions for playing the game are then provided. Students must click the “Start” button to begin the game, and they progress through it by completing different levels. As they successfully complete levels, students are awarded points or stars. Once a level is completed or time/moves run out, students…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 6
B. Design - 7.5
C. Engagement - 8

7.2

Add Some “Game Play” to Math

7

Mobile Math Playground provides several dozen math games designed for elementary and middle school students. The games’ aim to develop students’ ability to add, multiply, divide, use decimals, and problem solve. To access the games, the webpage first has to be loaded and then a game selected. The game loads and directions for playing the game are then provided. Students must click the “Start” button to begin the game, and they progress through it by completing different levels. As they successfully complete levels, students are awarded points or stars. Once a level is completed or time/moves run out, students are shown their score and then have the option to progress levels (if the level is successfully completed) or try again. At any time, students can return to the website’s menu of games by tapping their browser’s “Back” button.

Instructional Ideas

  1. When wanting to use a game in the classroom, teachers can first connect their computer or tablet to a projector and model how to play the game. Next, they can ask a student to come up and play the game. At that point, teachers can ask if there are any questions. That way, teachers can begin using the game as a class reward or assignment.
  2. When a game aligns to the math skill being taught, teachers can allow students to play a game that reinforces the skill. After a certain amount of time (e.g., 5, 10, or 20 minutes), teachers can have students report their progress.
  3. As a homework assignment or summer learning project, teachers can have students play this website’s different games. For accountability purposes, teachers can create a log that parents/guardians are asked to sign.
  4. After playing a game, teachers can ask students what skill they practiced by playing the game and then explain how they did, in fact, practice that skill by playing the game.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility

Screenshots

screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-4-47-25-pm screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-4-49-26-pm screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-4-47-59-pm screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-4-47-37-pm