Quick Math

Free! Quick Math provides users with a multi-functional tool that calculates and provides step-by-step directions for solving a variety of mathematical problems. To begin, users must first select the type of problem they wish to solve, and their choices include Algebra (e.g., expand, factor, simplify, cancel, partial fractions, and join fractions), Equations (e.g., solve, plot, quadratics), Inequalities (e.g., solve and plot), Graphs (e.g., equations and inequalities), Numbers (e.g., percentages and scientific notation), Calculus (e.g., differentiate and integrate), and Matrices (e.g., arithmetic, inverse, and determinant). Next, users must enter the problem into the website using the space provided and then click…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 6
B. Design - 6.5
C. Engagement - 6.3

6.3

Quick Math: A Computational Resource

Summary : A Quick-&-Easy Math Tool!

Quick Math provides users with a multi-functional tool that calculates and provides step-by-step directions for solving a variety of mathematical problems. To begin, users must first select the type of problem they wish to solve, and their choices include Algebra (e.g., expand, factor, simplify, cancel, partial fractions, and join fractions), Equations (e.g., solve, plot, quadratics), Inequalities (e.g., solve and plot), Graphs (e.g., equations and inequalities), Numbers (e.g., percentages and scientific notation), Calculus (e.g., differentiate and integrate), and Matrices (e.g., arithmetic, inverse, and determinant). Next, users must enter the problem into the website using the space provided and then click the action button (e.g., Go, Solve, Factor, etc.). In response, the website will calculate the problem’s solution and then provide step-by-step guidance for how it solved the problem.

Please Note: Users will have to register with the website to access all its content.

Instructional Ideas

  1. Teachers can give students a word problem. In response, students will read the word problem, analyze it to understand the type of calculation needed to solve the word problem (e.g., equation, factoring, plot, etc.), and then solve it. To check their work, students can translate the word problem into its mathematical form and enter it into this website. Lastly, they can have the website solve the problem and then compare their answer to the website’s solution.
  2. When students get stumped by a problem, they can enter it into this website to read the solution and view the steps used to solve the problem. Next, students can compare their work to the solution provided by the computer and explain to their teacher, a partner, or in a journal where they got off track when trying to solve the problem.
  3. As a review activity, teachers can call out a type of math problem and have students write a mathematical problem that aligns to the type called out by the teacher on their paper. Next, teachers can have students swap papers and let a classmate attempt to solve the problem the first student wrote. To conclude the activity, teachers can have students use this website to solve the problem, and students can compare their answer to the one produced by the website. At this point, teachers can call out a new type of problem, and the activity can begin again!
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility

Screenshots

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