ScreenChomp

ScreenChomp is an audio/visual recording app that provides users with an interactive whiteboard and a voice recording feature. Users can draw on ScreenChomp’s whiteboard using markers in a variety of colors and thicknesses, as well as insert images on it by taking a photo or importing a picture from their own library or Dropbox account. Once users are ready to begin voice recording, they can tap the “rec” button, which allows them to record their voice and simultaneously use the whiteboard. When finished recording, users tap the “stop” button, and will then be prompted to title the video…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 7.7
B. Design - 8
C. Engagement - 9

8.2

Summary : Take a chomp out of screencasting with this app!

This item is no longer available. (id:442415881)

ScreenChomp is an audio/visual recording app that provides users with an interactive whiteboard and a voice recording feature. Users can draw on ScreenChomp’s whiteboard using markers in a variety of colors and thicknesses, as well as insert images on it by taking a photo or importing a picture from their own library or Dropbox account. Once users are ready to begin voice recording, they can tap the “rec” button, which allows them to record their voice and simultaneously use the whiteboard. When finished recording, users tap the “stop” button, and will then be prompted to title the video before ScreenChomp uploads the video to its cloud. Once uploaded, users are able to view their video in the ScreenChomp app, online, over email, or share it on Twitter.

Please note: Users are unable to edit videos once they have been recorded.

Instructional Ideas

  1. After reading a text, students can create an illustration or import an image that represents a key component or theme from the text using ScreenChomp. Next, students can record a voice narrative explaining how the drawing or image represents the key component or theme. Upon completion, students can email their videos to the teacher for grading.
  2. When studying a large topic such as types of plants or different countries, teachers can assign students a sub-topic in that unit and instruct them to create a screencast about it using ScreenChomp. For example, if studying countries from around the world, each student could be assigned a country, and each would be responsible for uploading images that represent that country. Some pictures might show foods, festivals, or historical people/events from that country. Next, students could narrate an explanation of what the pictures represent. Completed videos could then be shared with classmates by posting the links on a class website. If the same assignment is done annually, teachers could easily collect a large amount of these videos over time for future reference and use.
  3. Teachers can use ScreenChomp to conduct a debate. Instead of traditional debates in which two opposing sides discuss their different views about a topic, teachers could provide students with a persuasive prompt and instruct them to use ScreenChomp to argue their position. For example, when debating if school uniforms should be mandatory for all public schools, teachers can present the prompt to students and require them to make a video using ScreenChomp to present their position. It is recommended that teachers set certain parameters for video assignments (e.g., the video lasts for 90-120 seconds, contains two images, and references three statistics). The videos could then be posted to a class website, where students would have to view a certain amount of their classmates’ videos. After viewing a classmate’s video, students compose a paragraph indicating whether they agree or disagree with the video’s argument and why. Finally, this piece of writing and the video could be submitted to the teacher for grading.
  4. Instead of a traditional math test, teachers could assign students a complicated problem to solve. Using ScreenChomp, students could be instructed to record themselves solving the problem on the whiteboard while simultaneously narrating the steps used to solve it. Completed videos could then be emailed to the teacher for grading.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity

Screenshots

The app was not found in the store. 🙁

Screenshots

The app was not found in the store. 🙁