Sound Uncovered

Sound Uncovered contains interactive lessons on everything from the science of vibrations to Beatles music. A hallmark of the Exploratorium family of apps, each Sound Uncovered lesson begins with an attention-grabbing interactive activity. From there, users tap a “show me more” tab that explains the sound phenomena that was just demonstrated. Topics covered include beats, interference, major and minor scales, dichotic melody, backmasking, phonemes, dipthongs, sine-wave speech, resonant frequency, octaves, and much more. The lessons in Sound Uncovered use real-world examples, drawing everywhere from nature to automobiles, all of which illustrate the science of sound. Instructional Ideas Teachers…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 6
B. Design - 8.4
C. Engagement - 7.1

7.2

Summary : Real-world interactive science of sound lessons!

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Sound Uncovered contains interactive lessons on everything from the science of vibrations to Beatles music. A hallmark of the Exploratorium family of apps, each Sound Uncovered lesson begins with an attention-grabbing interactive activity. From there, users tap a “show me more” tab that explains the sound phenomena that was just demonstrated. Topics covered include beats, interference, major and minor scales, dichotic melody, backmasking, phonemes, dipthongs, sine-wave speech, resonant frequency, octaves, and much more. The lessons in Sound Uncovered use real-world examples, drawing everywhere from nature to automobiles, all of which illustrate the science of sound.

Instructional Ideas

  1. Teachers can use Sound Uncovered to have students review different sound concepts explained within the app. Following, the teacher can instruct students to listen to different audio recordings (e.g., television ads, radio shows, interviews, etc.) to identify sound concepts in use. After identifying a specific sound concept, students can be instructed to write a brief synopsis of the sound concept and how it is used it the recording. These synopses can be shared with the teacher via email or posted to a class website.
  2. Using Garage Band, the teacher can divide students in small groups and have them record themselves playing a commonly recognizable song in different scales. These recordings can then be shared by posting them to a class website, where students can listen to them in small groups, or they can be shared by the teacher who could play the songs for the entire class. Following this activity, students choose a song other than their own, and compose and submit a written assignment to the teacher about their impressions of the song and whether those impressions changed as the song was played in different scales.
  3. As demonstrated on Sound Uncovered, different rooms have the ability to make the same sound different to the ear. To further explore this concept, teachers can instruct students to record themselves using Garage Band either singing, playing a musical instrument, or talking in at least four different rooms in the school. Student recordings can then be shared with the class for a collaborative activity with the teacher, in which a chart is compiled of the rooms in the school with the best acoustics.
  4. Teachers can use Sound Uncovered for an activity about how words are perceived differently as a result of the McGurk Effect by first distributing a list of those words to students. Following, students are divided into groups of three and instructed to arrange themselves in a line, with two students facing each other and the third student standing behind the two students facing each other. The student in the middle of the line is then instructed to pronounce the words previously distributed on the list. After the student in the middle pronounces the words, students swap places in the line and repeat the activity. Once all of the students have been in all three positions in the line, students can be instructed to answer, either verbally or in writing, how they perceived the words being said by the student in the middle of the line when they were behind and/or in front of him or her. Finally, the teacher can lead a class discussion about why students think a discrepancy exists in the words that were said. Conclude the activity by having students open the Sound Uncovered app to learn more about the McGurk Effect.
  5. Teachers can have students research the science of sound in consumer products. For example, students can be instructed to view different television commercials that feature unique sounds, together as a class. The teacher can engage in a classroom discussion with students as to what sound technologies or uses of sound they noticed, what made those sounds stand out, and did accompanying images complement or detract from the sound? Following, the teacher can then assign students specific television commercials to view independently and have them compose a written response in which they are to answer the same questions asked in the classroom discussion, as well as cite Sound Uncovered sources that help explain the sound phenomenon represented in the commercials. The teacher can have students submit the assignment through a file-sharing app, over email, or by posting to a class blog.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility

Screenshots

  • ‎Sound Uncovered Screenshot
  • ‎Sound Uncovered Screenshot
  • ‎Sound Uncovered Screenshot
  • ‎Sound Uncovered Screenshot
  • ‎Sound Uncovered Screenshot