Watson Speech-to-Text

Free! Watson’s Speech-to-Text web application converts spoken word into transcribed text. After launching the website, users must first choose if they want Watson to detect multiple speakers or just one speaker by clicking the “Detect Multiple Speakers” box. Next, users must select if they want to speak directly into their computer’s microphone or upload a file. If users chose to record themselves speaking, they need to click the “Record Audio” button. Watson will then record and transcribe their words. If users decide to upload a pre-recorded conversation (.wav, .flac, or .opus files only), they can do so by clicking the…

Review Overview

A. Instruction - 8
B. Design - 7.3
C. Engagement - 8.7

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Add a Little Watson to Your Classroom!

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Watson’s Speech-to-Text web application converts spoken word into transcribed text. After launching the website, users must first choose if they want Watson to detect multiple speakers or just one speaker by clicking the “Detect Multiple Speakers” box. Next, users must select if they want to speak directly into their computer’s microphone or upload a file. If users chose to record themselves speaking, they need to click the “Record Audio” button. Watson will then record and transcribe their words. If users decide to upload a pre-recorded conversation (.wav, .flac, or .opus files only), they can do so by clicking the “Upload Audio File” button, selecting the file, and then opening it. In both scenarios, Watson will transcribe the spoken words into text, which users can then copy into another document.

If users wish, they can change the language of the recording with the options under the “Voice Model” menu. In addition, users can access more nuanced options with the “Word Alternatives” and “Spotted Keywords” options.

Instructional Ideas for Watson Speech-to-Text

  1. Teachers can have students record themselves having a conversation with small groups, so they are able to document a record of what was said. After the conversation, students can copy and paste it into an Evernote, Grammarly, or Zoho That way, they will be able to share the recorded conversation easily.
  2. Students who need support can open this website during a class to record a lecture, conversation, or another classroom happening. They can then save the recording by copying and pasting it into an Evernote, Grammarly, or Zoho Or, for students who need support with typing, they can use Watson to record themselves speaking their thoughts and then copy and paste the transcription into an email or post it to a classroom website.
  3. As part of an improv, drama, or creative writing lesson, students can have a dialogue while Watson records it. (Make sure the “Multiple Speakers” option is selected.) When finished, students can copy their transcribed recording into a Google Doc and make edits to it. They can then share it with the class by posting it to a classroom website.
  4. When students are learning a foreign language, teachers can have them use Watson to record themselves speaking the foreign language. They can have a running transcript of what they said, which they can review for accuracy, pronunciation, and meaning.
A1. Rigor
A2. 21st Century Skills
A3. Conn. to Future Learning
A4. Value of Errors
A5. Feedback to Teacher
A6. Level of Material
A7. Cooperative Learning
A8. Accom. of Individual Diff.
B1. Ability to Save Progress
B2. Platform Integration
B3. Screen Design
B4. Ease of Use
B5. Navigation
B6. Goal Orientation
B7. Information Presentation
B8. Media Integration
B9. Cultural Sensitivity
C1. Learner Control
C2. Interactivity
C3. Pace
C4. Flexibility
C5. Interest
C6. Aesthetics
C7. Utility

Screenshots for Watson Speech-to-Text

Screenshot of Watson Speech-to-Text

Screenshot of Watson Speech-to-Text

Screenshot of Watson Speech-to-Text

Screenshot of Watson Speech-to-Text